redshock

I was a bit suprised to hear that XNA only worked on Visual Studio Express, but apparently that was just the XNA Game Studio Express which basically gives you all you need for Windows and XBox 360 development. But say if you just want to make a PC game, you can go ahead and install the XNA Framework, add it to your WinForm project, and it will run fine from there. For instance, I just created a empty WinForm project using Visual Studio 2005 Standard, added the Microsoft.Xna references and finally added an initialization and render method. I compiled the application and had no side effects whatsoever. I believe Microsoft wants to enable Windows developers free tools to do what they please, but when it comes to XBox 360 games, of course there's going to be some cash to give because it does require specific tools. As far as their Windows Game Express Project and WinForms go, so far I haven't seen any differences. 

To get started, you can check out this link I posted earlier:

http://forums.microsoft.com/MSDN/ShowPost.aspx PostID=1028285&SiteID=1

One thing I must ask Microsoft is why don't you provide the XNA Framework SDK as an optional download for those who don't care about Express and want to specifically do Windows development Right now I had to pointlessly download Express to install the XNA Framework which came along with GSE. It was simply unnecessary and it may prevent wide adoption for non-games on the .NET platform.



Re: XNA Framework XNA Framework runs fine in Visual Studio 2005 Standard

dczraptor

You don't have access to the content pipeline in Visual Studio 2005 standard. Most people will still use the content pipeline in Windows development. Sure, you can compile a simple game, but unless you use Texture.FromFile, you won't be able to load in too many assets because you can't compile your assets into .xnb files.




Re: XNA Framework XNA Framework runs fine in Visual Studio 2005 Standard

redshock

True, but I never had to use a content pipeline before and it works just fine without. I usually use Texture2D.FromFile because it allows me to go in and edit the image much easier, plus it's what I have been doing for my previous titles. In a sense, it's like MDX development all over again with little loss. I can see why it would be benefitial for XBox 360 development, but quite frankly I don't need it. I would like Microsoft to look into the content pipeline though for non-game applications which basically just need the XNA Framework available. It seems like the benefits of the XNA Framework are definitely cut in half for those who don't care about a game studio. I don't do specifically game development all the time, so I would like to know what Microsoft can do for me as a software developer because I would like to choose the XNA Framework for .NET projects. I just don't have a real need to download a game studio just to use it. If it works fine for Visual Studio 2005 Standard/Pro for Windows development (which seems like it does), then I would expect Microsoft to complete it and I would definitely like to see the content pipeline included in the future. I was checking a few job search websites and I found non-game companies looking for those who know XNA. It's obvious that Microsoft should accomidate them.



Re: XNA Framework XNA Framework runs fine in Visual Studio 2005 Standard

ProfEclipse

As for the content pipeline not working with standard/pro, there is a reason for the "Express" in Game Studio Express.

To get the content pipeline with VS Standard/Pro, you'll need Game Studio Pro. The content pipeline isn't part of the framework. It's part of the studio. If want the studio features, you need the studio.





Re: XNA Framework XNA Framework runs fine in Visual Studio 2005 Standard

Jim Michels

Be careful with the "my way or the highway" mentality. It really hasn't been serving MS very well lately.

Visual Studio 2005 Professional is NOT a free edition of the development environment. Its not rediculous that developers may wish to use it for some XNA development.

While the Game Studio Pro version is the logical choice for the complete set of functionality, being so rigid that you intentionally avoid the Visual Studio 2005 Pro users, seems counter-productive and will send them into the hands of non-MS alternatives. (*cough* mono/tao/OpenGL)





Re: XNA Framework XNA Framework runs fine in Visual Studio 2005 Standard

redshock

Oh well, it doesn't matter anymore. Overall, I'm just stating XNA can run with Standard without having to use GSE. I'm sure there's downfalls and benefits, but that's for everyone to decide with what works in their project. I decided to stay in the native world, but it's cool knowing XNA is there for another crowd.



Re: XNA Framework XNA Framework runs fine in Visual Studio 2005 Standard

Flavious

redshock wrote:
Overall, I'm just stating XNA can run with Standard without having to use GSE.

Absolutely. I'm finding this works quite well for my needs.





Re: XNA Framework XNA Framework runs fine in Visual Studio 2005 Standard

ryan.rogers

Of course it can, at the end of the day the XNA Framework is just a bunch of managed libraries. Heck, use it with Notepad and the .Net Framework SDK directly if you desire. ;-P

On a related note, has anybody tried using a common "Class Library" project (either in VS or VCE) for hosting all of their game code, and using GSE Windows and 360 projects for just resources and main.cs You would simply have to add the two XNA references, and also setup the separate Configurations for Windows and 360 (output path, conditional symbols, etc).

I can't see any reason why this wouldn't work and I see a several key advantages:

- one project file to maintain for source

- no "Links" to maintain

However, I'm wondering if step debugging would work when deployed to the Xbox 360 As long as the pdb is there I can't see any reason why not, even though the code wouldn't be in the "Xbox 360" project itself. In fact, I could see it working if the "Class Library" project is loaded in VCE, but not VS.

Has anybody tried this I'm going to play around with it tonight a bit.

Ryan