RichBar

Not real sure if this is a new thread or not, but is it possible to create a game (actually more of a simulation) using the XNA game studio that would run in a browser window Does not necessarily have to actually run from a online web server, just be browser based.

Thanks




Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Rick Mogstad

nope.



Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

David Weller - MSFT

It's not possible, but the more important question is, "Why would you want it to run in a browser "




Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

RichBar

Ok, maybe a better way to ask the question, is there a way to compile a game and have it sitting on one of the new U3 flash drives and execute from within the framework of the U3 operating system.

My questions come about due to trying to determine a venue to create training simulations where nothing can be installed on the (gov) PC. So my development environment has to allow for one or the other, browser or the new U3; and at this time I'm not eve sure if the U3 os will meet the needs.

Thanks






Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Rick Mogstad

No matter what you run it from, you will need the .NET framework 2.0, the XNA framework, and DirectX 9 installed, at a minimum. These will need to be installed on the machine running the program.






Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Joel Martinez

David Weller - MSFT wrote:
It's not possible ...
Why not I would imagine that the process would be similar to what these guys did for Virtual Earth (visit the link in IE and click the 3D button).

I mean, you're not going to get away from having to install xna and all that jazz, but still, it's browser based :-P





Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Rick Mogstad

 Joel Martinez wrote:
David Weller - MSFT wrote:
It's not possible ...
Why not I would imagine that the process would be similar to what these guys did for Virtual Earth (visit the link in IE and click the 3D button).

I mean, you're not going to get away from having to install xna and all that jazz, but still, it's browser based :-P


That isn't really the same as running the game in a browser window (and certainly wouldn't meet his requirements).  At best you could essentially wrap the browser window around your application, but it really would be pointless at that point, IMHO.




Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Joel Martinez

 Rick Mogstad wrote:
That isn't really the same as running the game in a browser window ...
having the control, written in managed code, be able to interact with javascript code (and thus, other non-managed elements of the web page) certainly seems like it's "running in the browser"
... (and certainly wouldn't meet his requirements)
Agreed
At best you could essentially wrap the browser window around your application, but it really would be pointless at that point, IMHO.
I don't know ... seems pretty cool to me to be able to go to maps.live.com and have 3D hardware accelerated functionality. Raph Koster's newly launched (but still ambiguous) company Areae says it's doing some sort of MMORPG/Web2.0 mash up ... something like this just might fit into that sort of model.





Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Jon Watte

You can run WinForms controls in Internet Explorer web pages on Win32.

You can render from XNA to a WinForm Panel (or other control).

Thus, assuming you can get the security settings and download/install issues solved, you should be able to run an Xna application within an Internet Explorer web page. It probably won't work for Firefox, though.

However, if that's what you're targeting, you probably don't want to be using XNA, instead, you want to use Managed DirectX 1.1, which is more widely installed, and has an easier integration path with regular winforms.






Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Rick Mogstad

 Joel Martinez wrote:
Rick Mogstad wrote:
That isn't really the same as running the game in a browser window ...
having the control, written in managed code, be able to interact with javascript code (and thus, other non-managed elements of the web page) certainly seems like it's "running in the browser"



Certainly, but not in the context that the OP intended. I meant "Completely" in a browser, without having to download and install executables, for example. Even ActiveX would have been more streamlined. Having to download an executable, install it, and then be able to open it inside an IE window doesn't really seem to me to meet the definition, but there are certainly other ways of looking at it.
 Joel Martinez wrote:

I don't know ... seems pretty cool to me to be able to go to maps.live.com and have 3D hardware accelerated functionality. Raph Koster's newly launched (but still ambiguous) company Areae says it's doing some sort of MMORPG/Web2.0 mash up ... something like this just might fit into that sort of model.


It could, I suppose, but since you have to actually download/install the game, why run it in a browser window, when it already has its own window....






Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Stephen Styrchak - MSFT

I recommend you avoid putting managed controls or add-ins into native apps that don't have some kind of explicit support built-in to manage versioning. Hosting managed code in a native app works great as long as yours is the only managed code in there -- but if many people do this, then things fall apart quickly. The main issue is that managed components from different providers will be updated independently of one another. A host application can only have one version of the CLR loaded at a time, so if a v1.1 control and a v2.0 control are both loaded, the first one wins. That is, if the v2.0 CLR is hosted, then the v1.1 control could be broken (especially if the v1.1 control uses policy to give it permission to run). Likewise, if the v1.1 CLR is loaded, then the v2.0 control certainly won't work.

Versioning is pretty busted for managed add-ins (including managed controls) in native applications. Some applications provide support for it, like Office 2003 and soon Office 2007, but that is done with a bunch of extra infrastructure.

Anyway, my main point is that you currently should avoid putting managed code in the browser, even if it would satisfy your scenario. At this point, I don't believe that it would.

--Stephen





Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Michael Hansen

running managed directx as a user control inside IE

the asp net page control the managed directx user control

like flash and shockwave games

here is a link

http://www.3devolution.net/Portals/0/aspnetdirectx.zip

you need net framework 1.0 and managed directx 1.0

it can be converted,  to use xna BUT

you can not use it with the game dll

you have to create the device manual and set full trust on the iis

will only work with windows 2003 server

a tips "use xml as meshs and textures thay can be streamd from a server to the client"

 

merry xmax

 






Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

RichBar

Ok, thanks to every one for their answers, I do not beleive that XNA will work for the type of projects that are upcoming for my company. But I think I will still play around with it at home, you never know, it might be fun building some games.




Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

eyesonly

So are we to understand that there is no synergy between XNA and WPF/E

http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/asp.net/bb187358.aspx





Re: XNA Game Studio Express Games within a IE brower

Stephen Styrchak - MSFT

Currently, that is correct. The XNA Framework and WPF/E have nothing in them to facilitate them working well with each other. We are investigating a number of technologies and options right now to address the desire for a more "lightweight" download.

--Stephen