yuyang

In the simulation environment,How many milliseconds does the screen show a scene

Thanks.

yuyang



Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

Courageous

Are you talking about the Simulation window that opens up when you run and build your code





Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

yuyang

Hi,Courageous

Yes,you are right .

In addtion, Do you know the simulation engine interval It will be perfect.

yuyang





Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

Courageous

If you are seeing the Simulation window for just a blink of a second then there is an error within your code that makes the Simulation window to disappear so quickly. Once you have built and run your code, look at your output within Visual Studio, it will be giving you some error, if you can't make out the error do post it on the forum and I'll help you out.





Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

Mike R.

You can set the Simulation engine Interval in the simulation window under Physics -> settings.
In the field fixed time interval you can set how many seconds a Simulation step simulates.
I think the standard values is around 10 -15 ms

greets

Mike




Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

yuyang

Hi,Mike R

In the simulation window under Physics->setting->real time,if the real time is equal to 1,does it mean the simulation

interval is 1 ms

Thanks.

yuyang





Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

Mike R.

I don't think so.
The realtime Interval is just a "reference" value. realtime 1 means "A simulation step is in a dimension so that the simulation runs as fast as in real life" and realtime 2 means "twice as fast as in real life"

By using the fixed time interval you can be much more precise in setting simulation speed, but in principle you change the same setting.
The fixed time Interval let you define how many seconds a single simulation step calculates. The higher this number, the faster the simulation.

By playing a bit around with the two options I came to the observation that "realtime 1" is the same as something between "0.01 - 0.015 seconds are simulated per simulation step " because the simulation speed looked like the same as with realtime 1 setting (ok thats not a scientific observation but thats another point (-; )

therefor I guess that a simulation step is executed every 10ms - 15ms (if a simulation step is executed every 15ms and calculates the physics for 15ms it should be as fast as in real time).

I Think the developers can give you much more precise values for this but I hope this helps a bit.

best regards

Mike




Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

yuyang

Thank you for suggestion.

yuyang





Re: Microsoft Robotics - Simulation simulation interval

KyleJ - MSFT

If you specify realtime for the physics interval, it determines how long it took to resolve the previous frame and uses that value to increment the simulation time. This has the effect that physics objects will move in a realistic way regardless of the frame rate that your computer is rendering frames.

If you select Status Bar from the View menu, a status bar will be displayed at the bottom of the simulation window telling you what the current simulation time is and what the current framerate is. If the framerate is 60 frames per second, the time interval for each frame is about 16.67 ms. If the framerate is 30 frames per second, the time interval will be about 33.3 ms.

You can also keep the simulator locked on realtime but scale it by entering a scale factor. If there is a scale factor of 2 and the simulator is rendering at 60 frames per second, then each frame represents 33.3 ms in simulation time instead of 16.67 and objects in the environment will appear to move twice as fast.

The fixed time setting completely decouple the simulator from the actual amount of time that has gone by. Each frame take exactly the amount of time specified in simulation time. If you enter 10 ms, then each frame will represent 10 ms in simulation time regardless of the framerate. This mode can be particularly useful if you want to simulate over a long time at very high fidelity. You can set the fixed simulation time to something like 15 ms and then turn off rendering by selecting No Rendering from the Render menu. The simulator will not render the frames but it will run the physics simulation on them as fast as it can. Each frame represents 15 ms elapsed in the simulation environment. You can track the progress of the simulation using the status bar.

-Kyle