ksieburg

I am tasked with architecting 3 large web applications. Each application can work independently, but if the customer has purchased more than one of the applications or "modules", then they should work together.

I am by no means a software architect, but after doing some research I originally thought I would go with the Page Controller architecture. I would also use the Enterprise Library for the DAL and other features such as cryptography and validation.

I then discovered the Web Client Software Factory. It seems like a great way to build a modular architecture, but is it overkill I had a heck of a time getting the quickstarts to work and it seems like a steep learning curve.

My question is, should I keep it simple and go with my first option, or should I spend the time to learn how to use the Web Client Software factory. My biggest fear would be that I spent too much time learning how to use the WCSF and in the end ended up not needing it - or even worse - found out that inhibited certain must have features.

Thank to anyone who can advise or even just tell me about their experiences with WCSF.


Re: Architecture General Need help architecting a mid-sized web application

Constantin K.

This will not address your issue directly, but I recommend that you take a step back and think about the immediate and the future needs of the solution you're trying to design. The number of users, type of data, scalability needs, deliverable schedule, and funding should drive your approach to evaluation the most appropriate technologies and design patterns.

Look at the many "starter kits" available from Microsoft and the community http://www.asp.net/downloads/starter-kits/. Perhaps you can use a provided solution as a base or perhaps examining the architecture & source code of the solutions will help you understand how to structure your solution.

Constantin K.






Re: Architecture General Need help architecting a mid-sized web application

J. Ambrose Little

I hear the same thing from most folks who look into the WCSF. It's too bad. It definitely has a steep learning curve. But the good news is that in learning it, even if you determine you don't need it on this project, you'll have that knowledge both in case you ever do need the WCSF as well as simply learning general architectural principles from it. So I wouldn't look at it as a waste of time regardless of how it turns out for this application.

It's hard to provide much guidance with so little info, but as a rule, I do think using EntLib is a good choice. You might also look into DotNetNuke. It is a very successful modular ASP.NET framework, and you might find that you can pick that and just build your custom modules for it. If nothing else, you can learn from the approach they took in designing it.

It does depend on what you mean by "they should work together." Do they need to be visually interconnected Or are they just connected in shared data and application logic That will affect your choice.

BTW, I don't think the PageController will really help in either case; that's a more finely grained pattern than what you need for a modular Web architecture. But you end up using in ASP.NET no matter what, really, so it's not much of a choice you make. It's more how you use it. I definitely recommend using the base page approach as well as using Master pages, but again, none of these really speak to modular Web architecture in the broader sense of enabling multiple apps/modules to play well together.






Re: Architecture General Need help architecting a mid-sized web application

ksieburg

Thank you. I think I will go with DotNetNuke for this. My only issue would be that it's programmed in vb.net. Would it be hard for a c# developer to alter some of the core functions if needed




Re: Architecture General Need help architecting a mid-sized web application

LivetoCodeCodetoLive!

From my experience it hasn't been too hard to modify DNN modules, and you can mix C# and VB in .NET 2.0