Philipp Lamp

Are there any restrictions to think about when setting up a server for networking content

I heard that networking content on final discs (AACS, no emulator) has to be signed somehow. Is this right How could this signing be done



Re: HD DVD Interactivity Authoring Signing networking and PS content

Peter Torr - MSFT

Yes, at the moment all network content must be AACS-encapsulated just like the content on the disc. There really is no difference except that the encapsulation types you use change. For example, an XML file on the disc is encapsulated with a hash (which is then verified with the content hash table) whilst an XML file from the network is encapsulated with a MAC (which is then verified against a title key). This is all covered in the specs at www.aacsla.com






Re: HD DVD Interactivity Authoring Signing networking and PS content

Milo Winningham

The AACS spec is clear about requiring encapsulation for downloaded markup pages and script, because those are written directly to persistent storage, and all markup and script files in persistent storage must be encapsulated.

But what about text files or XML files that are not part of an advanced application Suppose I want to parse an RSS feed for example. Is encapsulation still required

I am also confused about how I would develop and test an application that required use of AACS encapsulation. It seems like I'd need to buy a new content certificate (for $1500) from the AACS LA every time I wanted to test something new. Am I missing something here

Also, do you know anything about the current state of networking support on the Xbox 360 Is there any kind of development mode to test networking and persistent storage code on it without AACS




Re: HD DVD Interactivity Authoring Signing networking and PS content

Peter Torr - MSFT

The short answer is "yes", all content to be used by the player except text files must be encapsulated. There are known interoperability issues with this requirement though, and I hope that the rules will be relaxed in some way. But I can't promise anything.

Text files do not need to be encapsulated, and the good news is that an XML file is just a text file :-). So instead of calling getResponseXML, you call getResponseString and then hand the string to XMLParser.parse. Voila! XML without encapsulation. Unfortunately there is no such work-around for images.

Testing and developing network content would typically be done on an emulator, which will be allow use of network features even without AACS. The Microsoft HDi Simulator can be used for intial prototyping of networking code, but obviously cannot be used to test a full-disc experience. Toshiba has an emulator which is distributed by Sonic Solutions (http://www.sonic.com/about/press/news/2006/12/sonicToshiba.aspx), and other player manufacturers may be releasing emulators in the future, too.

As for the Xbox 360, a normal retail box will enforce Restricted Mode for non-AACS content (which means no network access).






Re: HD DVD Interactivity Authoring Signing networking and PS content

Milo Winningham

That's a relief to hear that there's a workaround for text files.

I do have access to a Toshiba emulator. My second question was if there was any way to test the use of AACS-encapsulated content on the emulator (or any other device) without buying an official content certificate, but I guess that question may be better suited to someone at Toshiba or Sonic.

In a previous post you mentioned that player manufacturers should have a way for developers to test their applications without AACS. For Toshiba players, the emulator is available, but is there anything analogous for the Xbox 360

Thanks for all of your help.




Re: HD DVD Interactivity Authoring Signing networking and PS content

Peter Torr - MSFT

Yes, there will be such a solution for the Xbox 360 HD DVD player, but I can't really reveal any details right now. Stay tuned.

In the post you refer to, I actually made a slight mistake. The only requirement around non-AACS mode (from an HD DVD standard perspective) is that manufacturers must support such a mode so they can be submitted for verification testing. There is no requirement for player manufactureres to make this special mode available to the general public, although as we have seen with Toshiba (and soon the Xbox) some manufacturers will choose to do this as it is a great way to ensure title compatibility.