trommad


I am using the full version of SQL Server 2005, not the Express Edition. I already have about 600 users created within SQL server with login names and passwords. How do I manage to use the new features with the AspNetDB database with these existing users.

I think the new login controls are pretty nice, but how do I get them to work with the security within a full version of SQL Server 2005




Re: SQL Server

richbrownesq


Sorry, can you clarify what you're asking for.


You have 600 users created in SQL Server Do you mean you have 600 SQL Logins (ie which can connect to your SQL Server databases) or do you have a table in the aspnetdb database containing the login details of your users

As far as i'm aware, the aspnetdb handles login details for an application not logins for sql server and would suspect that you can use it no matter which version of SQL2005 you are using.







Re: SQL Server

Caddre

It is actually very easy go to the location below in your C drive and run aspnet_regsql.exe to create the database and add the connection string the link below and you can add users with the Web Site Admin tool. Post again if you still need help.

C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727

http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2005/08/25/423703.aspx







Re: SQL Server

trommad

Within SQL Server 2005 I have about 600 existing users. These are created within SQL server 2005 and are completely independent from the aspnetdb.mdf file. The new ASP.net configuration tool uses the aspnetdb.mdf file to manage the roles and users.

So is there a way to bypass the aspnetdb.mdf files and simply use the security built into SQL server 2005

I know that I can just build connection strings to login to SQL server 2005, but this will not use the cool features built into the login contols.





Re: SQL Server

trommad

I already did this. I have the aspnetdb within SQL server 2005 on my server. But how do I get the aspnetdb.mdf file to coordinate with the users that I already have created within SQL server





Re: SQL Server

richbrownesq

I would suggest that you can't. In order to use these features you'll need the users within the tables in the aspnetdb database. Remember, SQL Server logins differ from logins to your application logins.

Your application will typically only need one SQL Server login to connect to the database and all the application users are stored in that database.






Re: SQL Server

trommad

I currently have a standard application that builds a connection string based on the login name, password and database chosen. I have about 30 or so underlying SQL server 2005 databases that the app can connect to based on the connection string. So the same front end can access different underlying SQL data based on the connection.

Even if I transfer all of the SQL logins to the aspnetdb.mdf file, how do I tell it which users have access to an underlying database

My goal is to only be building one front-end to link to any underlying back-end in SQL server





Re: SQL Server

Caddre

trommad wrote:
I already did this. I have the aspnetdb within SQL server 2005 on my server. But how do I get the aspnetdb.mdf file to coordinate with the users that I already have created within SQL server


You cannot use the ASPNETDB without that connection string in the link I gave to you because it is an application service created by the Asp.net team to help Asp.net developers to add users to their application. Download video #13 in the link below for how to add the connection to your Web.Config not SQL Server. Hope this helps.

http://www.asp.net/learn/videos/#howdoi






Re: SQL Server

trommad

If I setup only one SQL login and use the application logins, then how do I control the underlying rights for each user such as data-reader, data-writer and so on

Or would you recommend that I just build connection strings to connect to SQL server and not use the applicaion logins

That is how I am currently doing it.





Re: SQL Server

Caddre

I think you need to open that database and look at the tables, views and stored procs because it is a complete application service which let you put users in role, profiles and personalization. The roles in that database are not SQL Server roles but are similar. Video #7 covers that for you.